Review of Elaine Corvidae’s The Sorceress’s Orc

I grabbed Elaine Corvidae‘s The Sorceress’s Orc off of the KDP free list. I’m so glad I did.

Description from Goodreads:

Giavolo: proudest of the city-states and home to the great university, where the Magical Sciences are taught alongside more mundane studies. The city has been at war for longer than any of its inhabitants have been alive.

Giavolo: proudest of the city-states and home to the great university, where the Magical Sciences are taught alongside more mundane studies. The city has been at war for longer than any of its inhabitants have been alive.

Vervain: Mistress of the Magical Sciences, she is dismayed to find herself assigned a bodyguard after divination reveals an ill-defined threat to the university’s teachers. Even worse, the bodyguard is an orc.

Riyu: Vervain’s orc bodyguard is determined to save her life—if she’ll let him.

Brighthand: When this sinister figure attacks the university and kidnaps Vervain’s partner, it’s up to Vervain and Riyu to get him back…or die in the attempt.

Review:

This is the first book by Elaine Corvidae that I have ever read. I am definitely a new fan. I loved, loved, loved this story. It’s not often that I all out rave about a book, but this one deserves all of the praise I can lavish on it. Vervain was a sharp tonged professor of the Magical sciences with a razor wit and a scathing attitude. I loved her. She let off some zingers that kept me laughing. She reminds me of what I imagine Minerva McGonagall would be like if she never got flustered and got frustrated enough to speak her mind. Vervain had that same kind of dedicated academic spinster feel to her. But she never held back, not in her words, deeds, or feelings. She spoke her mind, did what she felt was right, and followed her heart at all costs. How could I not love her?

Then there was Riyu…SWOON! I never would have expected myself to fall in love with an orc, but I just couldn’t help it. He was marvellous, calm, loyal, dedicated, built (if a little green and tusky), gentle and soft-spoken, despite his capacity for violence and accepting of his situation. My heart broke for him a little when he related himself to the male in the tale of the Storm Witch. The interaction between him and Vervain was priceless. Corvidae really managed to provide a lot of information about his mood or true feelings through subtle hints such as the position of his ears and such. It made him feel very expressive, even if he didn’t actually say much.

There were a few areas that I would have like explored a bit more. What happened to Cardamom or was there an significance to the earrings Riyu wore,  for example? It makes me wish for a continuation of the story. But really I’m thrilled that it is a stand alone book. Everything I read lately seems to be part of a series. It is refreshing to finish a book and story at the same page. I will DEFINITELY be checking out more books by this author.

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