Tag Archives: werewolf

Review of Lycan Legacy – Prey, by Veronica Singer

I received an audio copy of Lycan Legacy – Prey from the author, Veronica Singer.

Description from Goodreads:

Prey,” whispered my inner wolf. There was a certain beauty, a certain simplicity, to her animal mindset. She was quick to label anyone or anything we met as “Pack,” “Predator,” or “Prey.” Together, wolf and woman, we always managed to tell where anyone stood. Until the day we met that damned Magician in Tokyo. 

Luna White is a runaway, a lone werewolf running from her home and pack and her Alpha’s obsession with using her to expand the pack; a plan that would have devastating consequences for Luna. She runs to Tokyo, where American werewolf packs are unknown. With a big personality and ego to match; she lands in Tokyo with a splash.

Mason Carter is a Magician. He traveled from America and settled in Tokyo. He doesn’t care for werewolves; their lack of control runs against the principles of magic. However, Mason has a secret; he knows how to help the incredibly rare female werewolves keep from losing their minds during pregnancy. He won’t reveal this to any werewolf, fearing that unrestrained breeding of werewolf litters will destabilize the supernatural community.

The clash between the powerful Alpha and a Magician threatens not only Luna but the burgeoning love she feels for Mason.

Review:

This wasn’t bad, a lot better than some werewolf books I’ve read. And I really appreciated that Mason wasn’t a alpha A-hole. He wasn’t a pushover, but he was totally willing to bend to Luna’s more obviously dominant personality type. I enjoyed their banter and the world Singer is building in this first book of a series. 

However, I thought the plot-line (a male wolf trying to forcefully possess and ‘breed’ a female) was trite and overused, and the plot jumped around, feeling disjointed. This wasn’t at all helped by the fact that Luna’s character was quite inconsistent. She was running scared one minute, then badass, threatening alpha queen the next, before going back to scary-cat again (all without reason given in the story).

Having said all that, I did enjoy it and I’d probably even read the next one. Cornelisse did a good job with the narration, though I think she mispronounced some of the Japanese. (I took two semesters in college, most of which I don’t remember. So, I don’t speak it, but I do remember the pronunciation of the syllabary and I’m fairly sure Cornelisse wasn’t correct more than once.) Further, it sure sounded like there were some misused English words too. But I suspect that was her being true to the text. This is one of the downsides to audiobooks instead of textual books. I’d know if it was an editing mistake if I saw it (or if I just misheard). Regardless, none of it was too egregious, just something I noticed.

Review of Mating the Huntress, by Talia Hibbert

I heard so many good things about Talia Hibbert‘s Mating the Huntress that I bought a copy, even though M/F paranormal erotica almost always does me wrong. (Spoiler, this one didn’t.)

Description from Goodreads:
Chastity Adofo knows a monster when she sees one. As soon as Luke Anthony wanders into her family’s coffee shop, she recognises the evil lurking beneath his charming smile and fantastic arse. The handsome werewolf is determined to have her—but she’s determined to cut out his heart.

Little does she know, Luke’s plans for her are far more pleasurable than murder. And when the full moon rises, all bets are off…

Review*:
Cute, fluffy, and funny
High on consent and female autonomy
Adorable-sexy is a thing and Luke is it

Depth is skipped to make it a novella and you feel it
Fairly low on the sizzle scale for an erotica (but not enough plot for a romance)


*My laptop battery died before I had a chance to review this book and it was several days before I remembered to come back and do it. So, we get a bullet-pointed version instead. It happens.

Review of Coveted, by Shawntelle Madison

I picked up a signed copy of Coveted, by Shawntelle Madison in a second-hand shop.

Description from Goodreads:
For werewolf Natalya Stravinsky, the supernatural is nothing extraordinary. What does seem strange is that she’s stuck in her hometown of South Toms River, New Jersey, the outcast of her pack, selling antiques to finicky magical creatures. Restless and recovering from her split with gorgeous ex-boyfriend, Thorn, Nat finds comfort in an unusual place: her obsessively collected stash of holiday trinkets. But complications pile up faster than her ornaments when Thorn returns home—and the two discover that the spark between them remains intense.

Before Nat can sort out their relationship, she must face a more immediate and dangerous problem. Her pack is under attack from the savage Long Island werewolves—and Nat is their first target in a turf war. Toss in a handsome wizard vying for her affection, a therapy group for the anxious and enchanted, and the South Toms River pack leader ready to throw her to the wolves, and it’s enough to give anybody a panic attack. With the stakes as high as the full moon, Nat must summon all of her strength to save her pack and, ultimately, herself.

Review:
This was not very good. It was simply dull and inconsistent. One moment the narrator was going on about how Nat had no friends, the next her best friend was showing up on her doorstep. One moment she’s being treated like a pariah by her family, the next they’re there for her. (And visa versa, they flipped several times.) For the whole book Nat was completely spineless, super subservient and inferior to everyone, then she randomly whipped out the alpa attitude.

Then there was all the back and forwards with Thorn. The fact that he abandoned her five years earlier and basically ruined her life wasn’t ever addressed. This irritated me on two fronts. First that the loss of a man ruined her life and no one seemed to blame him for the dick move or give her time to grieve. (Instead they made her condition significantly worse by being inconsiderate and then further blamed her for the predictable results). Second he was never expected to apologize or even explain and she instantly forgave him. Worse, she’d been waiting for him for 5 years without word and didn’t seem to need to forgive him.

This forgiveness for men carried over in the whole book. Nat was thrown out of the pack and practically disowned by her family for not behaving just as they want (they called it being weak). But her brother was a womanizing ass, her father a killer, the alpha cruel, and her love was fickle and disloyal. Still, no one ever did anything by praise and support them.

I disliked the book. I can come up with a dozen reasons why, but the main one is that Nat was so weak, and whiny that I basically hated her. I thought her OCD was interesting, but that wasn’t enough to make me warm up to someone so willing to be a doormat and who shows NO GROWTH throughout the book.