Tag Archives: shifters

Review of Binding Shadows (Tooth & Spell #1), by Jasmine Silvera

I purchased a copy of Jasmine Silvera‘s Binding Shadows through Amazon.

Description from Goodreads:

There are two rules: find a way to use your magic and never reveal it to anyone.

Hunting down lost books is more than a job, it’s a way for Barbara to conceal her powers in the mundane world of the university library. One misstep and she risks exposure to ruthless necromancers willing to destroy anything supernatural they cannot control. But when the prickly new professor in charge of her latest assignment proves more than he seems, rules and reason are no match for her growing fascination.

After years of battling to cage the beast within him, Tobias returns to Prague and the safety of his pack of brothers. Unfortunately, his new job handling a collection of rare editions comes with a research assistant irresistible to both beast and man. Revealing his secret could endanger his entire family and he refuses to risk passing on the curse in his blood.

When the discovery of an enchanted book of spells triggers unpredictable surges in Barbara’s magic, unleashing the beast within himself may be the only way to free her. Trapped between a witch and a necromancer, they must survive a perilous reckoning with the past, or neither will have a future.

Review:

I absolutely loved this—grumpy, cinnamon bun hero, and a smart librarian heroine. Their romance was adorable. The mystery kept me engaged. The world was interesting (if a little vague). And the side characters made me laugh. On finishing, I immediately went to try and buy the sequel, which isn’t out yet. Why does the universe punish me like this? WHY?

My only criticism is that the book could have done with another pass from a copy editor. There are the occasional double words and thought/though kind of mishaps. But it was not enough to make me not love this. Since I couldn’t get Gruff Older Brother’s book (because that’s who it better be about) I went ahead and bought the first in the Grace Bloods series instead.

Review of Claiming Ana (Triple Star Ranch #1), by Brynna Curry

I received an Audible code for a copy of Claiming Ana, by Brynna Curry.

Description from Goodreads:

The child of a gypsy and fey, small-town veterinarian Dr. Anastasia Brannon has always hidden her magic for fear of ridicule. A red-hot encounter with the new PI in town makes their attraction impossible to deny. Throwing caution to the wind, she indulges her desires but keeps her secrets close.

A man with a shady past and secrets of his own, Howl Raven uses his feral talents and tracking skills to make a living, doing his best to lay low and hide the curse that haunts him every month. So far, so good…until an uncontrollable shift outside the full moon leaves him the victim of a werewolf hunter.

When she finds the enigmatic investigator wounded in the woods near her cabin during a storm, Ana provides medical care on instinct. She may be the only one who can banish the wolf from Howl’s blood, but at what cost?

Review:

This was not great. It started out well enough by introducing several interesting characters that then play essentially no role in the book at all. (I assume they are only there because they’ll have their own future books.) The love is instant, the plot is thin and the ending anti-climactic. Basically, had the author taken the time to develop this into a full-length novel (where she could have fleshed characters, plot, and the world out) it could have been pretty good. But she didn’t. Instead, it’s barely 75 pages and the reader feels all that it lacks.

On a side note, I really wish American authors would get on board with the fact that Gypsy is considered a slur and an insult and shouldn’t be used casually. I realize that that message hasn’t been as widely heard on this side of the Atlantic and it has developed a different meaning that many are reluctant to give up. But many who can claim the heritage have been fairly vocal that they wish it not to be used.

The narrator did a pretty good job, outside of the occasional tendency to get a little overly dramatic.

Review of Dead Eye (Tiger’s Eye Mystery #1), by Alyssa Day

I picked up a copy of Dead Eye, by Alyssa Day, during a freebie day on Amazon.

Description from Goodreads:

For Jack Shepherd, tiger shape-shifter and former soldier, life is heading for a dead end. Dead End, Florida, to be exact. When he learns that he inherited a combination pawn shop/private investigation agency from his favorite uncle, Jack’s first job is to solve his uncle’s murder. Because sometimes it takes a tiger’s eye to see the truth.

Review:

I thought this was amusing, but a little light on content. I liked the characters but didn’t think the romantic subplot was developed well enough. (Day seemed to be hinting at something interesting that never came to anything.) The plot stood alone, but I definitely felt the fact that it is a spin-off series. There were just too many references to past events the reader has no access to if they’ve not read the other series. The mystery was neatly set up, but the villain was dispatched with shocking ease and the whole thing felt anticlimactic. All in all, I liked it enough to read more of Day urban fantasy/ paranormal mystery writing, but not enough to call her a favorite.